"Hollow mountain", 2011 Pendelic marble installation view Thessaloniki biennial 4 curated by Adelina Cuberyan van Furstenberg  2013

"Hollow mountain", 2011 Pendelic marble installation view Thessaloniki biennial 4 curated by Adelina Cuberyan van Furstenberg  2013

Hollow mountain ΠΕΝΤΕΛΗ, 2011-2013

In the Ancient Greek world Pendelic marble was considered the finest for its purity and glowing white colour.  The world renowned marble was used in the construction of many important buildings including the Parthenon and sculptures of the Golden Age.

The ancient quarry of Pendeli was officially closed in the 1970s, but before that, Pendelic marble was used for sinks, bathtubs, kitchen counters and other architectural details during the vast urbanbuilding boom of Athens during the 1950s through 70s. Now, though the extraction of Pendlic marble is unlawful, the marble known as "Dionisiou" is quarried from another side of the same mountain, and is used for all types of construction and objects.

 The work, Hollow mountain, uses pieces collected from the vast discarded marble found in various small industries for stone on the outskirts of Athens: bits and pieces of kitchen sinks form the letters of the name 'ΠΕΝΤΕΛΗ'. The marble is placed on the ground and each letter is 50x150x100 cm.

Hollow mountain is a monument to Pendeli, refering to the appropriation and transformation of ancient ruins. The sculpture is also about waste and destroyed landscape - literally, and as a metaphor for values, that have been exchanged in the interest of the building-industry's throw-away mentality and the urban reality that has resulted.

"Hollow mountain", (detail) 2011 Pendelic marble

"Hollow mountain", (detail) 2011 Pendelic marble

 

In the process of construction, "Hollow mountain", 2013 Aliveri, Evia Greece